One of Functional Movement Systems Most True and Interesting Models: The Joint to Joint Approach

Posted: March 1, 2014 in Uncategorized
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We must look at our body like a bunch of different parts that are linked together by many joints.

The joint-to-joint approach looks at our joint tendency directions (the tendency for joints to move in a certain direction – towards stiffness or weakness) and what each joint is responsible for in our bodies. The foot is our stable platform that connects us with the surface of the ground and it has a tendency to move towards weakness therefore, we must maintain its stability. The ankle is a mobile joint and has a tendency to move towards stiffness therefore, we must maintain its mobility. The knee is a stable joint and therefore, we want to maintain its stability. The hip -> moves towards stiffness -> maintain mobility. The lumbar (lower back) region -> moves towards weakness -> maintain stability. The thoracic spine (T-spine) -> moves towards stiffness -> maintain mobility. The scapular region (shoulder) is a little more complicated because a lot are going on in this area. The scapula is the stabilizer of the shoulder joint and thoracic spine and it also controls/maintains the integrity of the glenohumeral (shoulder) joint during movement. Therefore, we need to maintain the stability of the scapula along with mobility of the shoulder joint. And finally we have the cervical spine or neck area which is a mobile area and therefore, requires mobility to move effectively. As you can see, the joint-to-joint approach makes great sense if you think about it and it clearly shows us the importance of maintaining its preferred movement (mobile) or non-movement (stable) capabilities.

~Open Our Minds
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